Don’t Give Up On Yourself And Your Rainforest Mind

I just love this…Never give up!

Your Rainforest Mind

photo courtesy of Nadim Merrikh, Unsplash

Don’t quit. Don’t stop striving. Don’t stop growing. Don’t stop believing.

Don’t give up on yourself.

Even if you grew up in a family of chainsaws. Even if you have been told over and over and over that you’re too sensitive, too dramatic, too smart, too quiet, too noisy, or too weird. Even if you think you’re too old or too young or too whatever. Even if you’re overwhelmed by politics or racism or natural disasters or anxiety or depression or physical disabilities. Even if you procrastinate. Even if you’ve changed jobs multiple times and never learned how to build rocketships and send them to the international space station. Even if your hair is curly and free range. Even if you don’t look like George Clooney or Beyoncé.

Even if you haven’t partnered with the person of your dreams and you don’t have…

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If You’re Gifted, Are You Responsible for Everyone and Everything Until the End of Time?

Your Rainforest Mind

photo courtesy of Ayo Ogunseinde, Unsplash

The following questions can plague the rainforest-minded:

If someone asks you for help, and you have the skills that they need, are you always supposed to say yes to them?

If someone asks you for help, and you have the skills that they need and you say no, should you feel utterly and totally guilty for the rest of your life?

If your intuition is often accurate, and you pick up information about someone, are you responsible for telling that person what you suspect is true about them?

If you can see into someone’s wounded soul and you have compassion for them, but in everyday life they’re toxic, manipulating creeps, do you have to keep being their friend?

There are many other questions, of course. Bazillions of them. But the above questions are in a particular category. It’s: If I’m gifted, I must…

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Spiritual Intelligence: Creating a Compassionate World

Your Rainforest Mind

photo courtesy of Arunas Naukokas, Unsplash

Being the super sensitive, emotional, deeply aware human that you are, I suspect that you’re feeling a bit discombobulated these days. OK. Extremely distressed and anxious these days. From where I sit in North America, there’s a lot to be discombobulated (read: extremely distressed and anxious) about. A lot. You may be overwhelmed with grief, rage, or despair. You may feel a responsibility to act but not know your best path. You may feel pressure to be brilliant because, after all, you’re so smart.

I want to send you some extra love and inspiration.

To do that, I need to step into more iffy territory. Some of you may balk. But these times require risk, expansion, and iffy territory.

Are you with me?

OK, then.

Here’s the overall plan:  Believe in your deeply introspective journey. It will heal you and inform your outer…

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Giftedness, Achievement, and Guilt

Your Rainforest Mind

photo courtesy Samuel Zeller, Unsplash

How are giftedness, achievement, and guilt related?

I’m glad you asked.

Here’s how:

People find all sorts of ways to define giftedness: High IQ, exceptional talent, 10,000 hours of practice, task commitment, academic achievement, high test scores, straight A’s in school, Nobel prizes, eminence, etc. Typically, high achievement is the main requirement.

If you don’t fit into the high achiever category, your teachers, relatives, therapists, and pets may not think that you’re gifted. And you may agree with them.

Not so fast, sweetie pie. Can I call you sweetie pie?

In my humble opinion, based on my many fabulous years communing with gifted kids and adults, high achievement may or may not be part of the picture.

And what is high achievement anyway, I ask you. Wealth? Awards? Good grades in school? Celebrity? iPhones? But I digress.

The gifted humans that I know were born…

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The healing art of nature

As a confirmed Grecophile, I was most surprised to find myself appreciating the Spanish culture on the Canary Island of Lanzarote at New Year.

Being in the country, immersed the culture, the art of the Spanish masters, such as Picasso and Miro, came alive for me. I appreciated the intensity of colour in their paintings, the boldness of their shapes, and their humour, humanity.

It was the masterful work of Cesar Manrique I have to acknowledge for that connection. How better to emerge from the very nature of existence in a place than to build within it, to grow from and dwell in its interior, as so artfully demonstrated in his genius, volcano house? His love of curves, as evidenced in all of his art installations, seduced me into the flow of his work, and his passion for nature. I loved to learn of his environmental activism and to read that as an artist he viewed his role as framing the beauty of nature, a view I share in relation to my amateur attempts at photography.

I am savouring the connection and the consequent reaffirmation of this aspect of my self, gently absorbing the new experiences and realisations into the whole.

Art is healing, healing is an art.

10 cases that defined 2017

UK Human Rights Blog

christmas-2960048_960_7202017 has been a dramatic year in global politics and no less in the world of human rights law.

It has been a fascinating time to be editor of the UK Human Rights Blog. As just a taster, decisions have ranged across issues of the best interests of a seriously ill child, the conduct of British soldiers in Iraq and whether a transgender father should be allowed access to his children in an ultra-religious community. But there is much, much more.

So pour yourself a large measure of whatever you fancy, unwrap that mince pie waiting for you in the larder, and let me take you by the hand as we embark on a whirlwind tour of 10 of the biggest human rights cases of the year:

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High Court decision refusing ultra-Orthodox transgender father access to children quashed — Paul Erdunast

I love the definition here of the reasonable person

UK Human Rights Blog

Open_Torah_scroll.jpgThe Court of Appeal reversed the judgment of the High Court that a transgender father from the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community should not have direct contact with her children. The case was remitted to the Family Court for reconsideration.

Facts

The factual background is fully set out in the High Court judgment of Peter Jackson J (as he then was). The parents and their five children are all from the ultra-Orthodox Charedi Jewish community of North Manchester. The mother and children remain there, while the father no longer lives within the community after leaving in June 2015 to live as a transgender woman. Both parents agree that the children should be brought up within the community.

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